Date of Graduation

5-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Agricultural & Extension Education (MS)

Degree Level

Graduate

Department

Agricultural Education, Communications and Technology

Advisor

Kate Shoulders

Committee Member

Don Johnson

Second Committee Member

Don Edgar

Third Committee Member

Jessica Blythe

Keywords

Agricultural Education, Preservice Teachers, Professional Identity, Secondary Education, Self-Efficacy

Abstract

During the nineteenth century, a decision was made to separate the preparation of agricultural education teachers from their elementary and secondary counterparts (Hearings, 1908; Heren & Hillison, 1996; Hillison, 1986). The majority of land-grant universities and colleges have continued to prepare agricultural education preservice teachers within the college of agriculture, separate from other secondary education preservice teachers in the college of education (Myers & Dyer, 2004). Despite the differences among content disciplines, teachers who possess a strong sense of self-efficacy and professional identity have higher success rates in the classroom when it comes to collaboration, involvement, and student achievement (Ashton & Webb, 1986; Bandura, 1997; Dembo & Gibson, 1985; O’Bryant, 1992; Putman, 2012; Skaalvik & Skaalvik, 2008; Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001White, 2009; Woolfolk, Rosoff, & Hoy, 1990). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the self-efficacy and professional identity of preservice agricultural education teachers and other secondary education preservice teachers.

Data were collected from land-grant universities and colleges through either electronic or paper surveys. Respondents (N = 85) from 13 institutions included both agricultural education preservice teachers (n = 68) and other secondary education preservice teachers (n = 17). The instrument used in this study was a modified questionnaire that combined two previously established scales, Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy’s (2001) Teacher’s Sense of Efficacy Scale and Woo’s (2013) Professional Identity Scale in Counseling. Descriptive statistics revealed that agricultural education preservice teachers’ possessed a slightly higher level of self-efficacy than other secondary education preservice teachers. Conversely, secondary education preservice teachers’ possessed a slightly higher level of professional identity than agricultural education preservice teachers. The Pearson’s Correlation method was used to reveal a negligible relationship between self-efficacy and professional identity among agricultural education preservice teachers. However, there was a small relationship between self-efficacy and professional identity among secondary education preservice teachers. Further research should be conducted to establish the development of self-efficacy and professional identity throughout the teacher career cycle through longitudinal studies. Additionally, the literature suggest a relationship between self-efficacy and professional identity but more research is recommended to empirically prove and generalize this to all preservice teachers.

Share

COinS