Date of Graduation

8-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Community Health Promotion (MS)

Degree Level

Graduate

Department

Health, Human Performance and Recreation

Advisor

Jean Henry

Committee Member

George Denny

Second Committee Member

Bart Hammig

Third Committee Member

Kristen Jozkowski

Abstract

Objective. It was the purpose of this study to determine if different types of smokers, as defined by their smoking frequency and behavior in the presence of others or alone, indicate different cues and deterrents to cigarette smoking. Smoker types included daily smokers and occasional smokers, with who subgroups of occasional smokers including social smokers and chipper smokers. Methodology. A sample of 824 college students completed a cross-sectional survey regarding their smoking behaviors in the past 30 days, beliefs regarding health consequences and bystander intervention, and reasons and locations where they smoked and or refrained from smoking in the past 30 days. Results. Twenty one daily smokers (15.9%), 93 social smokers (70.5%), and 17 chipper smokers (12.9%) reported significant differences in cues and deterrents between daily and occasional smokers and chipper and social smokers. Daily smokers were significantly more likely than occasional smokers to report smoking in solitary locations (p<.033), after a meal (p<.001), to relieve boredom (p<.001), because they felt like it (p<.001), and to relieve stress (p<.001). Chipper smokers were significantly more likely than social smokers to report smoking in solitary locations (p<.001) and to relieve stress (p<.001). Daily smokers were significantly more likely than occasional smokers to list a smoke-free policy as a reason to not smoke (p<.001) and a college campus smoke free policy as a reason for not smoking (p<.001). Chipper smokers were more likely than social smokers to not smoke on a college campus due to a smoke free policy (p<.001). Conclusion. The different smoker types indicated different cues and deterrents to smoking. Future smoking cessation and prevention models should focus on meeting the need of the target audience based on their behavior. Alternative stress coping strategies for chipper smokers and smoke free policies in social environments are suggested effective methods for reducing smoking in college students.

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