Title

The Passivating Layer Influence on Mg-Based Anode Corrosion and Implications for Electrochemical Struvite Precipitation

Document Type

Article - Abstract Only

Publication Date

7-19-2019

Keywords

Corrosion, electrochemical engineering

Abstract

The removal and recycling of phosphorous from wastewater streams by electrochemical precipitation of struvite is a new and exciting approach; however, previous studies showed low percent yields in single cell batch experiments without pH adjustment. To investigate improvement of the percent yield, the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the electrodes was increased by 1.9-fold; consequently, a 27% increase in struvite production was observed for the pure-Mg anodes, but only a 2% increase for the AZ31 alloy. Potentiodynamic polarization experiments revealed 1.8-fold higher corrosion rates for the AZ31 alloy, which is in contradiction with the 2.8-fold higher magnesium dissolution rates calculated for the pure-Mg during struvite precipitation. This discrepancy between the techniques is attributed to the difference in the electrochemical environment, where the formation of an insulating layer of struvite on the anodes during the batch precipitation experiments is a critical difference. Based on characterization of the morphology and chemical structure of the precipitate, studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy, pure struvite was obtained with a particle size of ca. 73 μm in length and ca. 13 μm in width for pure-Mg and ca. 44 μm in length and ca. 8 μm in width for the AZ31 alloy anode, respectively.

Comments

Acknowledgements: LKN, FA, and LFG acknowledge the National Science Foundation (NSF) for financial support of this work through the INFEWS/T3 Award# 1739473. The team thanks Ostara Nutrient Recovery Technologies, Inc. for generously providing samples of Crystal Green product for experiments and testing. We acknowledge partial support from the Center for Advanced Surface Engineering, under the National Science Foundation grant No. IIA-1457888 and the Arkansas EPSCoR Program, ASSET III. Funding (or partial funding) for equipment/facilities used in this research was provided by the Center for Advanced Surface Engineering, under the National Science Foundation grant No. IIA-1457888 and the Arkansas EPSCoR Program, ASSET III.

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