•  
  •  
 

Abstract

The buffer capacity of a soil is a significant factor in determining the longevity of soil reaction (pH) adjustments by aluminum sulfate, Al2(SO4)3, or calcium carbonate, CaCO₂. After 12 weeks the modified pH values of the highly buffered Emory silt loam had changed substantially toward the original pH value of 7.6. Modified pH values for the Groseclose silt loam soil remained essentially unchanged under the same conditions. These differences in soil response to modified soil pH are related to the differences in the percentage of vermiculite chlorite and chlorite in the clay fractions of the two soils. The longevity of soil pH modification is related to total sycamore seedling dry weight and nutrient uptake. Though these components were significantly affected for plants grown in a Groseclose soil, the lack of significant response differences, except at the extremely low pH adjustment (5.21), in the Emory soil suggests a rapid change in modified soil pH toward the original soil pH value. The condition of the seedlings coupled with total dry weight accumulation and foliar nutrient content elimiates acid toxicity as a factor affecting growth and nutrient uptake. Plants grown in the Groseclose soil at pH 4.31 could be the exception.

COinS