•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Sixteen stands were harvested by either clearcut, shelterwood, group selection, or single-tree selection methods. Harvest productivity was evaluated in four consecutive years (1991 through 1994). Three of the stands had uneven-aged structure, the other 13 were typical, mature, even-aged stands. Harvest intensity (proportion of basal area removed) ranged from 0.27 to 1.00. Logging contractors used one to three sawyers with production chain saws to fell trees on all 16 tracts. There was no statistical difference in production rate between sawyers on the same stand. Harvested sites were similar in slope, average diameter at breast height (DBH) and pre-harvest number of stems by two inch diameter class. Total felling time (including walk, acquire, fell, and limb-top times) was inversely related to harvesting intensity and directly related to stem DBH. Factors affecting total felling time (in decreasing order of importance) were DBH of harvested stems, intertree distance, and harvest intensity. Felling productivity (100 cubic feet/hour) was found to be highest under high intensity harvests oflarge trees and lowest under low intensity harvests of small trees. Productivity was more sensitive to stem diameter than harvest intensity. Felling cost was shown to have an inverse relationship with felling productivity.

COinS