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Abstract

Population growth of red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) is often limited by the availability of suitable cavities. Structural damage to natural and artificial cavities intended for use by P. borealis is common. Roost and nest cavities of P. borealis often become occupied by other cavity-dependent species. Techniques for preventing damage to artificial cavities and for deterring southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans) use of otherwise serviceable cavities are described. Such cavity protection techniques may be necessary to prevent extirpation of small, isolated populations of P. borealis.

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