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Abstract

Because of increased environmental awareness by city planning commissions, there are more urban parks and greenbelt areas. These areas often result in increased human and wildlife contacts, thus resulting in the need for management plans regarding urban wildlife. From September 1998 to March 1999, we conducted mammal surveys of the urban greenspace Murray Park, Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas. Surveys were conducted using five methods: direct observations; spot lighting; live trapping; animal sign; and scent posts. Species recorded included, opossum (Didelphis virginiana), nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), fox squirrel (Sciurus niger), gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), beaver (Castor canadensis), woodchuck (Marmota monax), muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus), eastern cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus), swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus), coyote (Canis latrans), red fox (Vulpes vulpes), raccoon (Procyon lotor), mink (Mustela vison), river otter (Lontra canadensis), bobcat (Lynx rufus), skunk sp., white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) and cat (Felis sylvestris). These species represent 19 of the 23 mammals expected in surrounding natural areas. Management plans for urban wildlife need to include all mammals that potentially occur in the area.

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