•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Knowledge of physical and chemical properties of soil is relevant for landowners, researchers, and foresters, so that appropriate crop species and management practices to maximize site productivity can be selected. In addition to issues of plant productivity, the need for assessing soil properties has been expanded due to public interest in determining the consequences of management practices on soil quality relative to sustainability of crop ecosystem functions. The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) delineated soil mapping units to provide information about physical and chemical properties of soil in each soil series. However, soil mapping units do not provide details about the variability of soil properties within a single soil series. To determine the variability of physical and chemical properties within Amy soil series, 200 soil samples were collected to a depth of 0–15cm and 15–30cm from soil individuals mapped as the Amy silt loam soils in five different locations in southeastern Arkansas. Comparisons of soil texture, bulk density, carbon, nitrogen, Mehlich III extractable macronutrients, and micronutrients revealed significant differences among soil individuals/ locations for both depth increments. Additionally, all nutrients except potassium, magnesium, and copper differed between the two soil depths. The results suggest inherent variation in biogeochemical and geochemical cycling in the surface horizons of soils mapped as the Amy series.

COinS