Date of Graduation

5-2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration (PhD)

Degree Level

Graduate

Department

Management

Advisor

Anne O'Leary-Kelly

Committee Member

Jennifer Kish-Gephart

Second Committee Member

Denise Breaux-Soignet

Abstract

Sexual harassment training is a common organizational activity. Yet, we do not have very much knowledge about why sexual harassment training is effective or ineffective. There is evidence that employees often react negatively toward sexual harassment training, and these negative reactions may help explain inconsistent findings regarding whether sexual harassment training improves employees’ knowledge, attitudes, and transfer of training to the job context. This dissertation draws from social interactionism and identity theory to suggest that employees may experience threats to their valued identities at the announcement of sexual harassment training and during the administration of sexual harassment training. Interactional characteristics, specific identities, and employees’ changing perceptions as a result of the sexual harassment training program are considered as moderators. The effect of identity threat reactions on sexual harassment training outcomes, such as knowledge, backlash attitudes, and transfer of training, are also considered.

Share

COinS