Date of Graduation

12-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Human Environmental Science (MS)

Degree Level

Graduate

Department

General Human Environmental Sciences

Advisor

Glenda L. Revelle

Committee Member

Bobbie T. Biggs

Second Committee Member

Jennifer Henk

Third Committee Member

Mardel Crandall

Fourth Committee Member

Vernoice Baldwin

Keywords

Literacy, Reading instruction

Abstract

Technology is a part of our society and is ever changing. Therefore, it is important to examine the effects that such innovations have on parent-child interactions, especially those that have been shown to promote children's early literacy learning and future school success. This study was conducted in the context of a larger project, The Family Reading Project, which investigated parent-child engagement in joint reading activities using mobile devices. This research compared parent and child behaviors when reading traditional books versus reading e-books to determine if book format had any effect on parent-child interaction. The results of this study were that parent and child verbal and nonverbal behaviors did differ across the two book formats. In particular, traditional print book reading sessions contained more verbal and nonverbal exchanges between the parent and child regarding book content, which are known to support children's early literacy attainment.

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