Date of Graduation

12-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Psychological Science

Advisor/Mentor

Lamm, Connie

Committee Member/Reader

Alwood, Nancy

Committee Member/Second Reader

Westerman, Erica

Committee Member/Third Reader

Bustamante. Juan

Abstract

Emotion regulation is how people respond to and manage their reactions to life experiences, including resolving conflict between variable responses. Past research has associated the N2, an event-related potential associated with resolving response conflict, with both emotion regulation and negative emotion. However, to the best of our knowledge, no one has assessed if different emotion-regulation strategies are differentially associated with N2 activation. To assess this question, we conducted an EEG study with 147 participants. Participants completed the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) and then played the go/no-go game as their EEG data was collected. The relationship between N2 amplitude and self-reported emotion-regulation strategies on the CERQ, specifically rumination, catastrophizing, and self-blame, was assessed. No significant relationships between these CERQ subscales and the N2 amplitude were found. Future studies should investigate different ERPs, possibly in a clinically-anxious sample.

Keywords

N2, EEG, Emotion Regulation, ERP, Maladaptive

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